Mary Walker (1786 – 1846)

Courtesy of Cumbria Archives, another ancestor puzzle has been cleared up this past week.  But there is still more to find out, as is usually the case.

Mary Walker was my 5th great grandmother.  I have yet to discover her birth or baptism, but I believe I now at least know a little more about her life.

On the 14th September 1812, Mary Walker and William Benson married at Millom, Cumberland, England.  The witnesses were Mary Dobson, Ellenor Walker and John Newton.

My 4th great grandmother, Eleanor Benson, was baptised to William and Mary at Millom on the 5th November 1812.

I found an announcement in the 15th December 1849 edition of the Kendal Mercury of Eleanor’s marriage to my 4th great grandfather, Robert Holme(s), but interestingly her uncle, George Benson, rather than her dad’s name was mentioned in the announcement, leading me to believe that her dad, William Benson, at least must have died, possibly also her mum, Mary Walker by the December of 1849.

It had been difficult trying to find a William and/or Mary Benson in any census, after all, quite some time had passed between Eleanor’s birth in 1812 and the first available census in 1841 and there were no obvious possible candidates in the 1851 census.  William and/or Mary could have easily moved to another area by that time.

I decided to try and look for a marriage of a Mary Benson, and found one.  A Mary Benson married a John Swainson at Whicham, Cumberland on the 13th May 1826, but could this possibly be my Mary Walker?

I contacted Cumbria Archives to ask about this marriage, who were only too happy to help.  They found the details from the marriage, which I greatly appreciate:

JOHN SWAINSON of Dalton-in-Furness, and MARY BENSON, widow, married by banns in the presence of William Walker, Hannah Robinson and William Robinson.

I found John and Mary Swainson in the 1841 census at Broughton West, Lancashire.  John, aged 48, an agricultural labourer, not born in Lancashire, and Mary, aged 55, also not born in Lancashire.

John Swainson appears as a widower in the 1851 census, and I found a death registered in the Ulverstone registration district in 1846, so all available evidence appears to support my theory that both William Benson and Mary Walker had died before their daughter Eleanor’s marriage at Whicham in 1849.

It seems Mary Walker was born in about 1786, most likely somewhere in Cumberland, possibly in the Millom or Whicham areas.  The Ellenor Walker who was a witness to Mary’s first marriage, and the William Walker who was a witness to the 2nd marriage were possibly siblings, or cousins.  Do you know anything about these Walkers?  Please do contact me if you’d like to share any information.

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Some more newspaper notes

This is the second in a series of posts looking at excerpts from newspapers.

From the Saturday 15th December 1849 edition of the Kendal Mercury:

At Whicham, Millom, on the 6th inst. , by the Rev. G. Wilkinson, rector, Mr Robert Holme, huntsman to G. Woodburne Esq. Thurston Ville, to Eleanor, niece of Mr G. Benson, Rallies, Whicham.

From the 21st October 1854 edition of the Lancaster Gazette:

Ulverston – On the 14th instant, at the Parish Church by the Rev. S. Robertson, curate, Mr Joseph Holmes, husbandman, Hazelrigg, Cartmel, to Miss Ellen Lowis of Newland, near Ulverston.

From the Saturday 9th July 1836 edition of the Staffordshire Advertiser:

To be imprisoned three months – Randle Pointon, for stealing from the person of Thomas Cooper, at Audley, two half-crown pieces, his property.

From the Saturday 12th March 1836 edition of the Staffordshire Advertiser:

To be imprisoned three calendar months – Jane Darlington, stealing a piece of Kenseymere Cloth, and other articles, the property of John Harding, at Audley.

From the Monday 19th July 1897 edition of the Liverpool Mercury:

Fatal Accident to a St. Helens Boy

Samuel Francis, 13 yrs old, son of Wm. Francis, a collier, of 296, Park Road, St. Helens, died on Saturday night from injuries received on the previous Thursday afternoon.  Francis was in the employ of Councillor Ryder, mineral water manufacturer, and accidentally fell from a mineral water waggon at Burtonwood.  He alighted on his head, and it was afterwards found that he had fractured the base of his skull.  He gradually sank, and expired as stated.

From the Thursday 29th April 1937 edition of the Cornishman:

Mr M. Maddern, St. Just

The death occurred at his residence, 19 Pleasant Terrace, St. Just, on Wednesday, of Mr. Matthias Maddern.  He was well known in agricultural circles, having farmed at Botallack for many years.  He retired from farming within the last two years.

Mr Maddern was held in high esteem by all who knew him, and much sympathy will be extended to the widow and family in their irreparable loss.

The internment took place on Sunday afternoon at the Parish Church, St. Just, in the presence of a large number of sympathizers.  The service was conducted by Rev. A Tampsett (curate)

The mourners were:  Mrs Maddern and Mr R. Maddern (widow and son), Mr W. E. Maddern and Mrs M. E. Oats (son and sister), Mr J W Maddern and misses May and Mary Maddern (grandson and grand-daughters), Mr T. Maddern and Misses Hetty and Iris Maddern (brother and grand-daughters), Mr C. Maddern and Miss M. Oats (nephew and niece), Mr T. Maddern and Mrs R. Collins (cousins), Mr J. Maddern and Mrs W. E. Maddern (cousin and daughter in law), Mr W. Tregear and Mrs C. Maddern (cousin and niece), Mr F. Hocking and Mrs T. Maddern (cousins), Mrs J. Hocking and Mr J. T. Williams (sister-in-law and friend), Mr and Mrs J Hosking (niece and nephew), Mr B. Oats, Miss M. A. Oats and Mrs W. Hosking (cousins), Mrs T. Trevorrow, Mrs B. Hocking, Miss M. A. Pascoe, Mr J Dennis, Mrs W. Boase, Mrs J Hosking (cousins), Mr and Mrs H. Harry, Mr W. Harry, Mr T. Harry, Mr and Mrs Pope (friends) and others.

Floral tributes were:  “Whith love.” from his sorrowing wife;  “In loving memory,” from Robert, Hettie, Jim and family;  “To dear father, with love,”  from William Eddy and Rosie;  “To dear Grandad,” from May, Mary, Hetty and Iris;  “To darling granda, with little Maureen’s love”;  “With deepest sympathy,” from R and T Collins, Newlyn;  “With deepest sympathy,” from Mary, Ben and Florrie;  “In loving memory,” from Willie Mabel and Elizabeth;  “In affectionate remembrance, and with deepest sympathy,” from John and Lottie;  “In loving memory,” from M.S.H. Harry and Henry;  “With sincere sympathy,” from B. Lugg;  “With deepest sympathy,” from Mr and Mrs Pope, Barwis Terrace, Penzance;  “With deepest sympathy,” from Mrs Scutt and Eileen.

The bearers were Messrs. P. Rickard, P. Thomas, C. Gilbert, F. Stephens, R. Grenfell, and J. T. Williams.

The coffin was of unpolished panel elm, with solid brass furniture, with the inscription:

“Matthias Maddern, died 21st April 1937, aged 72 years.”

The undertaking arrangements were satisfactorily carried out by Jas. Roberts and Sons, St. Just.  The motor hearse was supplied by Mr Hawken, Penzance, and the cars by Mr. H. Eddy, St. Just.

From the Saturday 18th June 1859 edition of the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser:

ENGLISH PATENTS

Robert Lloyd Burrowes, of St. Helen’s, professor of Music, and John Knowles, jun. , of the same place, mine surveyor, for improvements in the construction of pianoforts and organs.  Dated December 9, 1858.